Ms. Kathryn Greer




 

Ms. Kathryn Greer, systems and digital content librarian, has been selected to participate in the 2019 American Library Association's Emerging Leaders program, a competitive leadership development program for early career librarians.

GGC students place at undergraduate research competition




 

Two teams of GGC students placed second and third at the Consortium for Computing Sciences in Colleges’ Nineteenth Annual Southeastern Small College Student Research Content last month.

Information technology majors Jeremiah Anderson, ’19, Dana Doghaimat, ’19, Carlos Maldonado, ’19, Timia Moses, ’18, and Nicholas Tyner, ’19, took second place for their research on "Molecules and Machine Learning: Image Classification for an AR-Enabled Classroom.”

Shazeed Mohammed, ’19, information technology received third place for his research on "Privacy and Security Issues as Obstacles to Product Delivery.”

Dr. Lior Burko publishes paper




 

Dr. Lior Burko, associate professor of physics, published a paper in the journal Physical Review with two colleagues from the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth. The authors calculated the total deformations suffered by a spaceship that falls into a realistic black hole, and found that this deformation is bounded and attained its maximum well before arrival at the singularity. This paper leaves open the possibility of safe arrival.

Dr. Burko also traveled to Taipei, Taiwan during the month of October to present lectures on extreme and nearly-extreme black holes and the singularity inside back holes during a conference organized by eight international universities.  

IT students receive first and second place during recent conferences




 

IT students receive first and second place during recent conferences

Information technology students and Technology Ambassadors Program participants, Eric Jenkins, ’18 and Brandon Henry, ’19 presented posters on behalf of their teammates during the ACM Richard Tapia Celebration of Diversity in Computing and STARS Celebration conferences in September 2018.

Henry presented and accepted a first placed award on behalf of his teammates Reuben Massaquoi and Jordan Harrison for their poster titled “Driving Future STARS: Inspiring the next generation of software developers,” which featured a space-themed scrolling shooter game.

Jenkins represented team members Anjan Panchatcharam and Jessica Wheeler, presenting a poster titled “Spreading Interest in Information Technology through Video Games” featuring a Guitar Hero®-like music game that took second place at both conferences.

GGC information technology professors co-author a paper




 

Dr. Sonal Dekhane, associate professor of information technology, presented a paper titled "Technology-Focused Service Learning Course to Increase Confidence and Persistence in Computing" at the 32nd Annual CCSC: Southeastern Conference at Roanoke College earlier this month.

Her co-authors from Georgia Gwinnett College’s discipline of information technology are Dr. Rahaf Barakat, assistant professor of information technology, Dr. Cengiz Gunay, assistant professor of information technology, Dr. Nannette Napier, associate professor of management information systems and decision sciences and Dr. Xin Xu, associate professor of information technology. 

Dr. Umar M. Khokhar publishes article in international journal




 

Dr. Umar M. Khokhar, lecturer of information technology, recently published an article titled "Cryptanalysis of IoTs Mutual Authentication Protocol" in International Journal of Distributed Sensor Networks.

In this article, the authors outlined their analysis after performing cryptanalysis of the recently proposed ultralightweight mutual authentication protocol, which lead to the discovery of pitfalls and vulnerabilities in the protocol design.

Dr. Umar M. Khokhar publishes article on KMAP+




 

Dr. Umar M. Khokhar, lecturer of information technology, recently published an article titled, "Efficient Hardware Implementation of KMAP+: An Ultralightweight Mutual Authentication Protocol" in the Journal of Circuits, Systems and Computers.

In this article, the authors proposed an efficient hardware architecture and reported their experiences with field programmable gate array and application specific integrated circuit-based implementation of recently proposed ultralightweight mutual authentication protocol named pseudo Kasami code-based mutual authentication protocol. 

Matthew Camp, ’19, information technology




 

Matthew Camp, ’19, information technology, has been invited to present the findings of his research in the development of  artificial intelligence that would identify tumors in brain scans during MIT's Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Undergraduate Technology Conference this month.  

Camp, a team of students and an interdisciplinary group of GGC professors, created a mixed reality application for the Microsoft HoloLens that allows students to visualize and to manipulate molecules as 3D holograms in the real world. Unlike traditional ball-and-stick chemistry models, the 3D HoloLens application allows students to engage in hands-on learning in a multi-user shared experience.

Dr. Binh Tran receives award




 

Dr. Binh Tran, assistant professor of information technology, recently received GGC's 2018 Outstanding Teaching Award.

Information technology faculty members co-author article on the security and privacy of information




 

Dr. Mirza Murtaza, associate professor of information technology, and Dr. Binh Tran, assistant professor of information technology, co-authored an article "Online Security and Privacy Concerns: Issues and Recommendations", recently published in Volume 16, Issue 8 of the International Journal of Computer Science and Information Security.

Security and privacy of information have been widespread issues of concern over the last few decades that range from an individual’s identity theft to major data breaches involving hundreds of thousands of customers at a time. The authors performed a survey analysis of more than 125 individuals and conducted a phishing experiment to determine how many students respond to such emails. 

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